Cut Down Email Clutter with Google Drive

Cut Down Email Clutter with Google Drive

There’s a direct correlation between work responsibilities and emails. The higher your position and the more decisions you make, the more emails in your in-box. The more successful your small business becomes, the more emails. The success is welcome; but the emails? It’s a begrudging task to sift through hundreds of emails when you open up your workspace in the morning. What makes it worse is that you can’t neglect it because a golden opportunity may just be hidden between the rubble. Use Google Drive as a free document management system Google Drive is a service that gives you free online space to store a limited amount of files.  If you have a Google account, then you already have access to Google Drive.  If you need more storage than the free version allows, you can purchase more as required. As far as email is concerned, with Google Drive, wading through the rubble doesn’t necessarily have to be equivalent to pulling your hair out. Sharing Google Drive folders makes editing documents and notifying others just so easy. Share folders with the people you work with so that they can also access the files you place in the drive. Think of it as a virtual drive that connects specific people via a common memory bank. Sharing folders doesn’t have to be just between colleagues and team members. You can also share a folder with clients. Your clients will appreciate the reduced emails and be impressed with your efficiency. So what does file-sharing have to do with making a full in-box less painful? Well, you can drastically cut down email clutter with...
Email Etiquette

Email Etiquette

  Email communication never came with an instructions manual. Back in the day, email was a great way to communicate, quick, easy and free. These days email is a huge drain on our productivity. It’s now an essential requirement for businesses and organisations to develop policy and guidelines around the different communication mediums and specifically the use of email to effectively communicate. What is acceptable in one organisation may not be acceptable in another, it all depends on the nature of the business and the culture. The answer to the question “when is it not ok to reply to an email” is – it depends. It comes down to productivity vs. politeness. Whether you work for yourself or you are an organisation, set the criteria upfront as to the expectations of how you want email to be handled. No one likes to be ignored however, with the volume of email in our inboxes these days it is often a physical impossibility to answer every email we receive. A good rule of thumb is if you can flick a reply within one sentence then get it done and answered – even if the response isn’t favourable. This way at least you aren’t leaving the sender hanging and you will most likely stop the next 4 follow up emails arriving. Try to avoid further discussion by leaving doubt or open ended questions, get to the point politely and hit the send button. To help receive a reply as the original sender, remember to keep your emails short and to the point. If the answer can’t be written in one sentence, pick...