Organising Your Mobile Office

Organising Your Mobile Office

A mobile office or virtual office allows you to run a professional business while not physically occupying office space, or a so-called “executive suite”. Where has the office gone? The laptop was the first piece of technology to free the modern office worker from a fixed location, but as technology continues to make advances, with laptops becoming lighter and more powerful, and free Wi-Fi hotspots popping up in every bar and coffee shop, the idea of being tied to one particular desk in a corner of cubicle country is no longer mandatory or in fact practical. The idea that you can work anywhere, anytime is attractive for a number of reasons:   There are a number of cost savings to not having to maintain actual office space; it provides employment opportunities for circumstantially marginalized workers such as stay-at-home parents; and it may benefit society in other ways such as reducing traffic and improving work-life balance. While many companies are allowing their workers to telecommute, increasingly freelance workers are also using technology to provide their services to clients. It has been estimated that by 2013 the number of office-based, non-office-based and home-based mobile workers will be close to 1,2 billion people, or more than one third of the entire workforce of the planet. Just how do you manage this new mobile environment? Keep your PC current It stands to reason that in the mobile office environment, your laptop computer is the heart, brain and lifeblood of your business. Some points to keep in mind: The smaller and lighter your device, the more mobile you will be. It makes sense to trade up...
Learn Some Speed Reading Techniques Fast

Learn Some Speed Reading Techniques Fast

One of the consequences of living in the Information Age is that we are bombarded with huge amounts of written material on a daily basis. We pay a heavy price for this wealth of information with the time we spend reading emails, memos, reports, presentations and other documents. The ease with which texts are distributed results in our reading load increasing all the time. Often we are copied or “cc’ed” in emails that might be of passing interest to us but really have little immediate value. However, the only way to find out whether or not a document requires your attention or is in some way important to you is by actually reading it. Often you find yourself halfway through a lengthy report before you realize that it has no bearing on your job function. This is where the art of speed reading can be a very valuable time management tool. If you can cut your reading time by half, and you consider that the average person spends two hours of their working day reading, you will immediately save yourself many hours a week. How to measure your reading rate The average person reads at a rate of 200 to 300 words per minute. To test your reading speed, choose a text and read for a minute, then count the number of words you have read. The result will be most accurate if you take a variety of texts, ranging from easy to difficult, and calculate your average rate. You can also take a test to establish your reading speed at a number of free websites. Once you know...
Why Multi-Tasking Could be Costing You Big Time

Why Multi-Tasking Could be Costing You Big Time

For years multi-tasking has been regarded as the epitome of good time management – doing two or even three things supposedly at the same time was regarded as surely the ultimate in efficiency and productivity. As it turns out, not so! The tide has turned on boasting about how adept you are at multi-tasking, nowhere more so than in campaigns against driving while talking on a mobile phone or even texting. It has been demonstrated that in potentially dangerous situations it is vital to be fully aware and paying attention to one task only. Are you multi-tasking or simply being distracted? But there is another downside to multi-tasking: Evidence shows that interruptions can cost you as much as 15 minutes to get back on track. You may think that you can browse your Facebook page while waiting for the photocopier to warm up, or talk on the phone while reading through emails, but research shows that this is actually cutting down on your productivity and that you are accomplishing far less rather than more. One study suggests that employees who use a computer at work are distracted as often as once every 10.5 minutes. So-called smart phones can provide even more of a diversion. What is often regarded as multi-tasking, is actually more accurately described as the brain rapidly switching back and forth between tasks – in fact, the performance of one task is constantly interfering with the performance of the other. Problems encountered when multi-tasking While seemingly paying attention to two tasks at the same time when multi-tasking, people are more prone to make mistakes, perform both tasks...